h1

Welcome to Eagle County Local History

December 22, 2009

Welcome to the Eagle County Local History blog: You Can’t Use it if You Don’t Preserve It!  I will be sharing interesting bits of Eagle County history for your edification and enjoyment.  Sign up, stay tuned!

h1

Ephemera!

April 7, 2014

Let’s talk ephemera.  From the Encyclopedia of Ephemera by Maurice Rickards, we see that: “Ephemera is the plural form of the Greek word ephemeron. Literally, it refers to something that lasts through the day, which is the case with some winged insects.  … Among several definitions of ephemera that Maurice Rickards proposed, the one that has gained widest currency is the ‘minor transient documents of everyday life.’”

Don’t we all have those transient documents!  Tax season keeps us looking for many of them.  Not surprisingly, there are many such documents here in the archives.

Posters have been collector’s items since the end of the 19th century.  Posters were originally pasted in place, so that collecting them made it necessary to turn to publishers’ files.  “The origins of the poster may be traced to the printed Proclamation and Public Notices of the 15th century.  Caxton’s printed advertisement for a newly-published prayer book, posted up at Westminister in 1477, may be described as one of the first commercial posters.” [Encyclopedia of Ephemera p.250]

Louise Walker and Jim Nimon pose by a poster congratulating them on being the first recipients of the annual Nimon-Walker Award. The award recognizes individuals for their contributions to preserving Eagle County history. The Eagle County Historical Society and the Eagle Valley Library District present the award each year in the spring.

Louise Walker and Jim Nimon pose by a poster congratulating them on being the first recipients of the annual Nimon-Walker Award. The award recognizes individuals for their contributions to preserving Eagle County history. The Eagle County Historical Society and the Eagle Valley Library District present the award each year in the spring.

Read the rest of this entry »

h1

Shop Locally!

February 26, 2014

On May 12, 1939, the Eagle Valley Enterprise published an article thanking local firms that helped build Eagle County.  After ten years of Depression economics, businesses were hard-pressed to stay open.  Of particular interest is the acknowledgement that local merchants support the communities in which they’re located:

“Do mail order houses to that? Do peddlers or out of town business interests of any nature do it? They take but never put, and you can’t keep on taking from anything without eventually impoverishing it and have nothing left from which to take for either you or the merchant.  Isn’t it good logic and common sense then for you to patronize these local merchants who have helped and will continue to help make this a finer community for you and your children and their children also?”

Almost 75 years later, it’s hard to disagree with that sentiment.  There were over 40 businesses listed and, happily, we have some historical photos to add to the paper’s text.

Verso of the receipt issued to H. Nottingham by Bob's Place [Minturn Colo.], R.A. Collins, Prop., Drugs, Sundries, Soda Fountain, on March 20 [no year], for 3 quarts of milk @ .30 each.  Clerk's initials: L. C.

Verso of the receipt issued to H. Nottingham by Bob’s Place [Minturn Colo.], R.A. Collins, Prop., Drugs, Sundries, Soda Fountain, on March 20 [no year], for 3 quarts of milk @ .30 each. Clerk’s initials: L. C.

Read the rest of this entry »

h1

WWBD? [What would Ben do? BENJAMIN FRANKLIN Postmaster General, July 26, 1775, to November 1776]

January 27, 2014

Well, let’s see.  It now costs 49 cents to mail a letter and 34 cents to mail a postcard and I’m not convinced that most of what I have to say is worth 49 cents to mail.

“In addition to first-class mail, the higher rates will apply to magazines, newspapers, advertising mail and bills, which together account for most of the 158 billion pieces of mail delivered every year.”  –Lisa Rein, Washington Post, Jan. 27, 2014

This, of course, leads me to thoughts of Eagle County mailings in the past.

Postcard from the Wells-Ryden collection

Postcard from the Wells-Ryden collection

Read the rest of this entry »

h1

Primary Source Materials! Yes!

January 17, 2014

An exciting topic that never gets boring is primary sources, first-hand testimony or evidence created by witnesses or recorders, regardless of format.  For our purposes here in local history, we rely on manuscript accounts of family life in Eagle County, photographs, government documents, and oral histories to document the historical record.

Very happily, I used some of these primary sources to track the L. M. Larson family in their move from Douglas County, Colorado, to Peachblow, eight miles west of Basalt in Eagle County, Colorado.  [When Eagle County was carved from Summit County in 1883, rail transportation routes and not geography seemed to determine the county lines.   Today, this leaves part of Eagle County along the Frying Pan and Roaring Fork Rivers with the majority of Eagle County along the Eagle and Colorado Rivers.]

Map from Basalt and the Frying Pan by Earl V. Elmont, 2004 p. 82

Map from Basalt and the Frying Pan by Earl V. Elmont, 2004 p. 82

Read the rest of this entry »

h1

2013 in review

December 31, 2013

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.  Thank you, helper monkeys and Happy 2014!  Jaci

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 6,400 times in 2013. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 5 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

h1

2013 to 1913

December 26, 2013

With 2013 almost done, it’s good to look back before we look forward to a new year.  Let’s look way back, to 1913.

Eagle Valley Enterprise Dec. 19, 1913

Eagle Valley Enterprise Dec. 19, 1913

Read the rest of this entry »

h1

Thankful, We Are

November 26, 2013

It’s the season to celebrate the harvest and give thanks for what comes to us.  Eagle County, largely agricultural until the past few decades, has always known how to throw a good dinner.  The Home Demonstration Club of Brush Creek put together the Eagle County Cook Book in the late 1930s with some fascinating recipes contributed by women with very familiar names in Eagle County.  As we enjoy our celebrations this week, let’s remember some of these women.

Lillian Eaton and Gladys Hall, a friend from Denver, at McCoy Creek Ranch circa 1918.  Fowl is on the menu.

Lillian Eaton and Gladys Hall, a friend from Denver, at McCoy Creek Ranch circa 1918. Fowl is on the menu.

Read the rest of this entry »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 285 other followers